[IBLE] FOBF – my Spark bird

 

I just happened to look at my feeder a moment ago, and saw my “first of bird feeder” Lazuli Bunting.  The Lazuli Bunting was my ‘Spark bird” for getting me hooked on birding back when I was 14 in May of 1975.  In the few moments following, 4 more male Lazuli Buntings joined him, for a total of 5, along with a pair of House Finches and a lone American Goldfinch.  Definitely made my day, as the weather continues to drizzle outside…  Jonathan, HSB area

[IBLE] Black-headed Grosbeak

 

This morning a Black-headed Grosbeak is in my yard, first time since I’ve lived here 16 years. First it was at the suet feeder cage, then it tried my tube feeer, but the perches are too close to the ports for its taller body. It perched on the feeder while House Finches came in to feed then flew off. I observed it for almost ten minutes. The grosbeak is back at the suet feeder! Less than two minutes after I wrote the previous.

The Cooper’s Hawks are in the neighborhood again. Last summer the pair raised two young. May 10 one of the hawks  perched in two places in my front yard.
Diann Stone
Boise Depot Bench

[IBLE] Grasshopper Sparrows & Poorwills (Ada)

 

I found an easy place to get Grasshopper Sparrows in the Boise foothills. See checklist for details: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36725626

If you walk back in the dark you can hear the Common Poorwills but watch out for Rattlesnakes. I was walking back in the dark and  thought I better turn on my flashlight just in case. I rarely see them but I did last night eventually. See video in checklist. If snakes make you skittish, you can listen to the Poorwills from Cartwright Road. Although that’s where I about stepped on one getting out of my truck in the dark.
You can also see a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher on the way that hangs out at Currant Creek Trailhead http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36724079
Good birding!
Jason

[IBLE] Custer County Birds

 

Greetings, Birders.
I did some scouting today for eBird’s upcoming Global Big Day on Saturday. White-faced Ibis and a Spotted Sandpiper continue at Bar-D Reservoir (aka Ingram’s Pond). Also a Wilson’s Phalarope was working along the back edge near the ibis. The loud songs of the Yellow-headed Blackbirds almost drowned out the whinny of a Sora.
Driving south of Arentson Gulch was interrupted first by three Pronghorns that could not decide which side of the road they wanted to be on. They crossed back and forth four times in front of me. After finally getting past them, I was stopped again – this time by a large herd of cattle coming right down the highway. The cowboys kept them moving but it was a good reminder to pay attention to the road while driving rather than look for birds!
I decided to venture up Birch Springs Road to the trailhead for Mt. Borah. Singing Horned Larks, Sage Thrashers, and Vesper Sparrows were in the sagebrush scrub, replaced by singing Cassin’s Finches, Dark-eyed Junco, and Chipping Sparrows at the forested trailhead/campground area. On the drive out, I got an all-too-brief look at an Ash-throated Flycatcher and was able to snap one poor photo before it disappeared. (http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S36725474)
Compared to last week, Mackay Reservoir had less waterfowl but more sparrow activity with singing Brewer’s and Lark Sparrows. I could not find a single Osprey after seeing four there before. Two Tundra Swans, three Caspian Terns, and a couple of White-faced Ibis were hanging out at the north end with a bunch of gulls.
House Wrens are in with two singing at the state park in Challis and another at the Mackay Reservoir dam. It seems that once I see or hear a new spring bird, it pops up everywhere in the next few days.
Good birding,
Wendy McCrady
Challis, ID

[IBLE] Red Knot at Island Park reservoir [1 Attachment]

 

[Attachment(s) from Cliff and Lisa Weisse included below] We didn’t find much today but I’ll take a Red Knot any time.  A nice breeding plumage bird too.  I’ll insert a photo below.  Other shorebirds present were few and included a single Sanderling, a good sized flock of American Avocets, 3 Black-necked Stilts, a few Wilson’s Phalaropes, a Killdeer, some Willets and a Long-billed Curlew.  Ducks seem to be scarce this year too probably because there is water running all over the place and they’re scattered in flooded areas.

The only other visit we’ve made was on Sunday and it was quiet then too.  Highlights were a flock of 6 Black-bellied Plovers and 6 Common Terns (the most I’ve seen here in spring). We’re yet to see a peep, godwit or dowitcher.  We’ll be hitting it regularly for the rest of migration – hopefully numbers will pick up…

On 05/10/2017 04:24 PM, Cliff and Lisa cliffandlisa@octobersetters.com [ible] wrote:

In case someone is close enough to take advantage, we have a Red Knot at the mouth of Sheridan creek.
Lisa

Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail.

 

--   Cliff and Lisa Weisse  Island Park, Idaho  cliffandlisa@octobersetters.com

__._,_.___

Attachment(s) from Cliff and Lisa Weisse | View attachments on the web

1 of 1 Photo(s)

[IBLE] More FOS’s

  Yesterday I encountered my first Black-headed Grosbeak of the year, singing in my neighborhood while I was performing my Poop Fairy duties in the back yard. I then found him, still singing, just 2 blocks away, and then I found a second one near Veteran’s Pond. I also found 2 Western Tanagers, the first on Stewart, near Esther Simplot Park (ESP), and the second on Lander, near the little slough across from the STP. (When I heard the first one it took a few minutes for my brain to connect the sound to the bird.) Yesterday also had a great display of a Bald Eagle at ESP again harassing an Osprey, only this eagle was an adult.

Today’s FOS was a Bullock’s Oriole at the end of ESP nearest to State St. I heard him and then some young friends confirmed that they had seen him. Nice to see young birders who are both knowledgeable and enthusiastic.

I also found that at least one Chipping Sparrow continues in my neighborhood. Unfortunately, the singing birds that are hanging out with him were hiding, and I couldn’t connect the song to a bird. Maybe tomorrow.

Tom McCabe, Boise

[IBLE] FOYs in Salmon (Lemhi County)

 

A trip to Salmon yesterday included some good birding and flood observation. Lots of locals were out checking the water levels on the Salmon River, which were high enough to prevent access to the sewage ponds. However, the nature trail at the Sacawajea Interpretive Center was in good shape and I found 35 species there. FOY sightings included Dusky Flycatchers and a singing Black-headed Grosbeak.
On the drive up from Challis along Hwy 93, a stop at the Cottonwood Campground (Custer County) yielded a singing FOY House Wren.
Wendy McCrady
Challis, ID

[IBLE] Teton Valley FOY’s

On Saturday and Sunday, I noted the following FOYs in Teton Valley:

Ski Hill Road (WY) from Teton Canyon up to Grand Targhee:

Fox Sparrow, Ruby-crowned Kinglets-many singing along road, Yellow-rumped Warbler

Teton River (Bates Bridge):  Yellow Warbler-singing, Long-billed Curlew, Willet, Wilson’s Snipe-winnowing, Swainson’s Hawk, Brewer’s Blackbirds

Driggs:  Brown-headed Cowbirds (also a group near the mouth of Horseshoe Canyon)

Teton River (Cache Bridge):  Cliff Swallows (35)

Packsaddle Estates:  Yellow-rumped Warbler including one Myrtle form, Green-tailed Towhee, House Wren, Vesper Sparrow

Susan Patla

Our neighborhood videoed a few Turkeys near Tetonia this week as well.

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