RE: [IBLE] Hawk movement in Pocatello area Sat

Steven,

Thank you for joining us in Idaho and on IBLE! I see you’ve surpassed my life list on eBird in Bannock County, very awesome and congrats! =)

I’ve been meaning to post a reply to your recent note about RBNU (Red-breasted Nuthatch). A couple days ago we witnessed an “outbreak” of RBNU here in west Boise, and just in our hood I found 15-20, most in family units I presume, because many of their vocals were other-worldly, way beyond their usual calls out in the jungle (woods, er, conifers). We’ve never seen so many of these beasties this close to home!

We still have 3-4 hummers, 1 Calliope, the rest Black-chins. And right now its drizzly wet here, so our feeders are in high demand, which supports one of my oldest hobbies: watching them argue, cuss, discuss, and chase around both the feeders and our salvias (still at peak bloom). Hoping for Anna’s any day now, since mid-Sept has been their arrival date during the last two years. Although, this flies against a long-held maxim that “the two best days of the year are when the first hummer arrives and when the last one leaves!” 😉 Actual author of this phrase is an old-timer I met in Sonoita AZ who fed LOTS of hummers.

Anyway, thanks for posting and a belated welcome to Idaho! Missy and I enjoy birding your area, especially along Rapid Creek and Mink Creek.

Larry Arnold

Boise

From: ible@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ible@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ‘Kahl, Steve’ Steve_Kahl@fws.gov [ible]
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 7:15 AM
To: ible@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [IBLE] Hawk movement in Pocatello area Sat

In a half-hr from my deck in Chubbuck Saturday afternoon, I saw 2 sharp-shinned hawks, 1 Cooper’s Hawk, 1 red-tailed hawk, 1 northern harrier, 1 turkey vulture and 9 Swainson’s hawks – all moving directly north to south. Each lifted on thermals and the west winds deflecting off the east bench, then glided south. Interesting to me because I felt no north component to the wind. The only migrant on the ground was a red-naped sapsucker.

Haven’t seen in a hummingbird in the backyard in almost a week.

Steven F. Kahl

Deputy Project Leader

Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex

4425 Burley Dr., Ste. A

Chubbuck, ID 83202

P (208) 237-6615 ext 112

F (208) 237-8213

“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.” Cicero

[IBLE] Hawk movement in Pocatello area Sat

In a half-hr from my deck in Chubbuck Saturday afternoon, I saw 2
sharp-shinned hawks, 1 Cooper’s Hawk, 1 red-tailed hawk, 1 northern
harrier, 1 turkey vulture and 9 Swainson’s hawks – all moving directly
north to south. Each lifted on thermals and the west winds deflecting off
the east bench, then glided south. Interesting to me because I felt no
north component to the wind. The only migrant on the ground was a red-naped
sapsucker.

Haven’t seen in a hummingbird in the backyard in almost a week.

Steven F. Kahl
Deputy Project Leader
Southeast Idaho National Wildlife Refuge Complex
4425 Burley Dr., Ste. A
Chubbuck, ID 83202
P (208) 237-6615 ext 112
F (208) 237-8213

“*If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.*” Cicero

[IBLE] Light flush yesterday

Today is quiet, except for a nest of Eurasian Collared Doves which must have come down in the night. Seems late to have fledglings, but 2 are hopping around on the ground, can’t fly yet & their hatched eggs & some sticks are under a blue spruce.

Yesterday, saw my first DE Junco of the season. And a flush of 6-7 each RB Nuthatches & RC Kinglets came through. A single House Wren was present yesterday & the most numerous migrants today are the White-crowned Sparrows (30+). Buteos appear to be staging, mainly RT Hawks & saw a lone Swainson’s Hawk.

Brian Carrigan
Blackfoot

[IBLE] Gray Flycatcher in Moscow

It was another very busy morning of migration in the University of Idaho
Arboretum and Botanical Gardens in Moscow. The best bird was my first GRAY
FLYCATCHER for North Idaho, foraging in the dry White and Ponderosa Pine
grove on the slope southwest of the lower pond.

Other migrants included:
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
VAUX’S SWIFT 1-fairly late
GRAY FLYCATCHER
Dusky Flycatcher 2-3
Empidonax sp. 1
Cassin’s Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 3
Red-breasted Nuthatch 10-15
House Wren 2
PACIFIC WREN: probably continuing from earlier this month
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 8
Hermit Thrush 3
GRAY CATBIRD: Uncommon migrant in the Arboretum and flagged by eBird as late
Cedar Waxwing 56+
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
MacGillivray’s Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler ~30 including one Myrte or intergrade
Wilson’s Warbler 11
White-crowned Sparrow 34+
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: continuing, possibly 2
Lincoln’s Sparrow 1
Spotted Towhee 1

The full list along with photos, videos, and full details on the rare Gray
Flyatcher are in my eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39212265

I also stopped at Kiwanis Park and Good Samaritan Village in east Moscow
and had additional migrants including:
Hammond’s Flycatcher 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch 12
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
MacGillivray’s Warbler 1
Audubon’s Warbler 2
Wilson’s Warbler 3
White-crowned Sparrow 8
Cassin’s Finch 1
Red Crossbill 2

Good Birding,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID

[IBLE] Re: American Golden Plover at Blacks Creek (Ada)

I tried to post this much earlier today to IBLE, but apparently screwed it up; I’ll try again.

The American Golden-Plover is still at Black’s Creek if you can navigate the howling wind. I saw it originally on the north side at mid-morning, then on the south side in the late morning. I did get some pics, including one as it flew. It showed a lack of the black auxiliaries that are found on the BBPL, along with a dark rump and tail, among several other features separating it from the BBPL. Here is the link to the checklist and pics. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39195012 https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Febird%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS39195012&data=02%7C01%7Cs_g_davenport%40hotmail.com%7C06fd06e4199a4bd8bcae08d4fc78b76a%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636411042774894795&sdata=VZcaC%2BwCFKXdz06td4fQVV6altoKtkZiwdCvbqUNjfM%3D&reserved=0 I also only saw one dowitcher when I circumnavigated the reservoir. It was feeding with a stilt sandpiper and several western sandpipers. There is a photo on the checklist and I would be curious on the opinions of others whether it is a LB or SB dowitcher. I thought it looked good for a juvenile of the “prairie” population of SBDO, but I really couldn’t rule out LBDO either. JC

Jon Curd
Boise

[IBLE] great discussion on CALBIRDS about Bobolinks

Fascinating stuff, just for fun…!

Larry Arnold, Boise

From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ‘Alvaro Jaramillo’ chucao@coastside.net [CALBIRDS]
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 12:25 PM
To: ‘Rob Fowler’; ‘Northwest calbird’; ‘Calbirds’
Subject: RE: [CALBIRDS] Big number of Bobolinks in Humboldt County

Rob

Amazing! Something you may keep in mind, recently a fall stopover has been found on the Galapagos Islands….which frankly makes no sense. Bobolinks winter east of the Andes, not West. What they are doing on an offshore island in the West is surprising. Perhaps they cut through and head east from there, or there is an unknown western wintering area in Peru somewhere? There are vagrant records in coastal Peru and Chile. But it is possible that the birds you are seeing are part of a yet unknown western migration route of the species, and your birds will wind up on the Galapagos. Below is a link to the Galapagos findings, although there is also a published paper in the Wilson Bulletin on this. I better get out in the morning and hope to hear one going over for the yard list in the next few days!

The Galapagos Gang: An Unusual Bobolink Stopover

Alvaro

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rob Fowler migratoriusfwlr@gmail.com [CALBIRDS]
Sent: Friday, September 15, 2017 11:39 AM
To: Northwest calbird ; Calbirds
Subject: [CALBIRDS] Big number of Bobolinks in Humboldt County

Hi all,

(For the Humboldt birders that are already aware of this occurence I am posting this to CALBIRDS since this is of statewide significance).

Since Wednesday (13 Sept) Humboldt County has seen an unprecedented incursion of BOBOLINKS here in the Arcata Bottoms. On Wednesday I estimated at the least 110 birds were present in a large field that is planted with oats. While present I and others witnessed a pure BOBO flock that we estimated to be around 70 birds lifted up and headed south; we watched them until they disappeared (I took photos of the flock and after counting each bird it looks like there was closer to 80 birds in that single flock). Photos and circumstances can be read in my eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39160154

Yesterday (14 Sept) there were still large numbers present with probably up to a 80-100 birds estimated. eBird list with some photos and some poor recordings of one bird (maybe an immature male?) singing: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39181623

The previous high count for Humboldt County was 27 from 9-12 October 1983. The only other high counts I can find are 60 and 70 birds in Santa Barbara County from 25 September 1979 and 20 September 1981, respectively.

I would love to hear of any other high counts from the CA that might be higher as I wonder if these recent Humboldt BOBO numbers might be a record high count for the state.

Thanks!

Rob

Rob Fowler
McKinleyville, CA

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